Friday, October 23, 2015

Recommended Reading List on Love, Intimacy and Relationships



Explore love, intimacy and relationships through a Jungian lens:

Another Piece of my Heart : with Badger McGee, Sett in His Eros Ways by Daryl SharpAnother Piece of My Heart is playful and thought-provoking, as befits the author’s style in integrating Logos and Eros while differentiating between the two. Sometimes bawdy and whimsical, often laugh-out-loud absurd, and always mercurial—it is deceptively easy reading, a page-turner bound to keep one up into the wee hours. All in all, it will stir the heart and mind of cognoscenti and new readers alike. Sharp’s prose is wry, sardonic, candid and resonates on many levels. With Badger McGee and Bo Peep in his basement and El Jay in his bed, this book by Daryl Sharp—still the Harold Pinter and Samuel Beckett of the Jungian literary community—will amuse and edify those who thought Jungian psychology was only for intellectuals and the elite. 


Eros : Melodies of Love by Daryl Sharp - In this final volume of his Badger Trilogy, Sharp pushes the boundaries of “subjective non-fiction” about as far as they can go. Still, true to his other books in the “Jungian romance” genre (which he created), he continues to explore the psychological aspects of relationship. Eros: Melodies of Love is informative, often playful or romantic, and always fun to read. Through his alter-egos Daemon or Badger McGee, Sharp deftly interweaves a colorful quilt of Logos and Eros, full of compassion, good humor and Jungian wisdom. Not for nothing has he been called the Harold Pinter and Samuel Beckett of the Jungian literary community, and this latest volume underlines it. Open it anywhere and be engrossed. This is a warm and thoughtful book with big ideas. Readers familiar with Sharp’s other writings will be delighted anew. Those who chance on this book will be moved to read his other works, which all highlight the task of living intentionally, psychologically conscious. 

Eros Naturally by Daryl Sharp - Eros, Naturally is a romp with gravitas. It is another “Jungian romance” by the author who created the genre, starting with Chicken Little: The Inside Story (1993) and continuing through over a dozen more tomes. No other writer has so adroitly interwoven Logos and Eros, thinking and feeling. In this new book, Sharp’s approach to psychic well-being, his “Jungian romances,” will interest more people in self-discovery than any of the many academic tomes on the subject. 

Eros and Pathos by Aldo Carotenuto - Why do we fear love? How do we invite betrayal? What can we learn about ourselves from eroticism, abandonment, solitude? What unconscious drives are at work in seduction and jealousy? Are love, suffering and creativity connected?

Getting to know you : The Inside Out of Relationships by Daryl Sharp - A lively discussion about relationships based on the ideas in Jung’s essay, “Marriage As a Psychological Relationship.”  This book presents complex material illustrated with everyday examples and some inescapable truths emerge, such as that successful relationships depend on becoming conscious of one’s personal psychology.

The Eden Project : In Search of the Magical Other by James Hollis - A timely and thought-provoking corrective to the generalized fantasies about relationships that permeate Western culture. Here is a challenge to greater personal responsibility, a call for individual growth as opposed to the search for rescue by others.

The Living Room Mysteries : Patterns of Male Intimacy, Book 2 by Graham JacksonA companion volume to The Secret Lore of Gardening, this book explores gay typology, with emphasis on the complex psychological dynamics underlying relationships between “blue” men and “red” men.

The Love Drama of C.G. Jung : As Revealed in His Life and In His Red Book by Maria Helena Mandacuru Guerra - The Red Book was always a true legend in the Jungian movement. It was thought to reveal the great secrets of the master’s life. Few people had seen it, but their description of it and the Jung family’s resistance to publishing it, turned it into a true mystery. Indeed, Jung’s amours have been almost as much of a mystery as the Red Book. I hope the reader has the same pleasure that I had in following the Eros-thread from his wife Emma through his patient Sabina Spielrein to his muse Tony Wolff, and so to the creation of the Red Book as uncovered by Maria Helena in this exciting and unique account of how Jung came to develop the concepts of anima, shadow, Self and individuation.

The Talking Cure : Psychotherapy, Past, Present and Future by Anthony Stevens – The Taking Cure is an immensely readable and entertaining overview that describes how the major schools of psychodynamic theory grew out of the psychology of their charismatic founders and have subsequently turned into exclusive and mutually hostile rival “sects.” The author argues that the best hope for the future lies in research to determine the positive therapeutic ingredients that all methods have in common. This combined, with the kind of undogmatic, open-minded humanity advocated by C.G. Jung could lead to the adoption of a new paradigm capable of transcending the differences between them – a paradigm adopted by a new breed of “evolutionary psychotherapists.”

The Secret Lore of Gardening : Patterns of Male Intimacy by Graham Jackson - An archetypal perspective on the psychological bond between “green” and “yellow” men, with affinities to earth and sky, matter and spirit, respectively, showing how the fruits of their symbolic gardening can be a deeply rooted affirmation of life. Literature, film and case material.

The Sacred Prostitute : Eternal Aspects of the Feminine by Nancy Qualls-Corbett - The disconnection between spirituality and passionate love leaves a broad sense of dissatisfaction and boredom in relationships. The author illustrates how our vitality and capacity for joy depend on restoring the soul of the sacred prostitute to its rightful place in consciousness.

The Use of Dreams in Coupling Counselling: A Jungian Perspective by Rene Nell - Psychotherapists of many different schools use dreams in individual therapy, but very few use them in counseling couples. Indeed, marriage and family therapists often have no experience in this area because dream interpretation is seldom included in their training. In this book, with the help of numerous examples, Dr. Nell explains the efficacy of dream interpretation when working with couples, individually and in groups, in the diagnosis and treatment of emotional disturbances.

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Dream Interpretation Recommended Reading List


Jung sees the dream as the steady endeavor of the unconscious to create the best possible equilibrium in the psyche. It is in the world of dreaming that the unconscious expresses itself, providing us with insight into the way in which we are operating in the world, providing us with insight into our feelings, our recurring patterns, our one-sidedness and providing new possibilities and opportunities where consciously we see none. It is through working with our dreams that we explore ourselves, come to know ourselves better and find meaning.

Explore your dream world through:

Animal Guides in Life, Myth & Dreams by Neil Russack - Russack’s moving narrative of his and others’ experience of animals—dogs, waterbirds, deer, whales, geese, frogs, elephants, dolphins, horses, boar, octopuses, unicorns and many more—teases out their psychological significance through the deft use of mythology, poetry, dreams and case material.

Awakening Woman : Dreams & Individuation by Nancy-Qualla-Corbett - In this unique collaborative work by an analyst and her analysand, a woman in midlife learns to understand her dreams, visions and emotions, and especially the kinship between sexuality and spirituality, thus acquiring an authentic sense of self.

Jungian Dream Interpretation : A Handbook of Theory & Practice by James A. Hall – A comprehensive guide to an understanding of dreams in light of the basic principles of analytical psychology. This book pays particular attention to common motifs, the role of complexes, and the goal and purpose of dreams.

The Dream Story by Donald Broadribb – This is a solid workbook for those seeking an understanding of dreams in the context of everyday life. The author provides a rare weave of theory and application, drawing on various schools of psychology and tracking recurring symbols in a series of dreams, whilst providing numerous examples.

 - A comprehensive study illuminating the depth and scope of Jung's magnum opus and its relevance to everyday life. Contains a treasury of material for understanding and amplifying modern dreams and other unconscious contents.

The Use of Dreams in Coupling Counselling: A Jungian Perspective by Rene Nell - Psychotherapists of many different schools use dreams in individual therapy, but very few use them in counseling couples. Indeed, marriage and family therapists often have no experience in this area because dream interpretation is seldom included in their training. In this book, with the help of numerous examples, Dr. Nell explains the efficacy of dream interpretation when working with couples, individually and in groups, in the diagnosis and treatment of emotional disturbances.

Visions in the Night : Jungian & Ancient Dream Interpretation by Joel Covitz - Thousands of years before Freud and Jung, “visions in the night” were an important source of divine guidance, and the role of dream interpreter was an established profession. The author examines ancient, medieval and modern literature for insights that illuminate a Jungian approach to the value of dreamwork in the analytic process. Includes case material. 2nd Edition, revised.



Thursday, October 15, 2015

Woman Studies : Recommended Reading List


Jung suggested that the drive to wholeness, to individuation is inherent in the psyche. The feminine journey towards individuation involves a deepening of life’s journey, going down into the depths of the soul, of healing and reclaiming lost parts. Thus individuation involves an increasing awareness of your own unique psychological realities, including your personal strengths and limitations, of re-awaking your wisdom, of reigniting your imagination, of reclaiming your authentic voice, of living by your own inner light.

Explore the feminine journey through:

Addiction to Perfection : The Still Unravished Bride by Marion WoodmanA powerful study of the nature of the feminine in food rituals, dreams, mythology, body work, Christianity, sexuality, creativity and relationships.

Alcoholism and Woman: The Background and the Psychology by Jan Bauer – This book compares medical and psychological models, and examines the success of Alcoholics Anonymous in terms of archetypal patterns represented by the Greek gods Apollo, Dionysus, Athene and Asclepius (the wounded healer)

Animus and Anima in Fairytales by Marie-Louise von Franz - Dr. von Franz devoted much of her life to the difficult task of interpreting fairy tales, bringing clarity and earthy good humor to the work. Another treasure from this great author, in which she focuses on what fairy tales can tell us about the contrasexual complexes—animus and anima—that inform our fantasies and behavior concerning the opposite sex, both inner and outer.

Awakening Woman : Dreams and Individuation by Nancy-Qualla-Corbett - In this unique collaborative work by an analyst and her analysand, a woman in midlife learns to understand her dreams, visions and emotions, and especially the kinship between sexuality and spirituality, thus acquiring an authentic sense of self.

Coming to Age : The Croning Years and Late-Life Transformation by Jane R. Pretat - A comprehensive overview of inner events and creative possibilities during the years after middle age. Prétat explores the tasks and potential rewards of this period, including the relevance of the Demeter-Persephone myth.

Conscious Femininity by Marion Woodman – Marion Woodman’s books have sold well over 800,000 copies, with 20 editions in 10 languages. Those already familiar with her work will value the deep passion that animates these candid discussions. For those who haven’t yet discovered her, this is an excellent place to start.


Descent to the Goddess : A Way of Initiation for Women by Sylvia Brinton Perera - Pioneer study of the need for an inner female authority in a masculine- oriented society and a journey into the underworld of Inanna-Ishtar, Goddess of Heaven and Earth, to see Ereshkigal, her dark sister, as must, modern women descend into the depths of themselves.

Eros and Pathos by Aldo Carotenuto - Why do we fear love? How do we invite betrayal? What can we learn about ourselves from eroticism, abandonment, solitude? What unconscious drives are at work in seduction and jealousy? Are love, suffering and creativity connected?

Eros Naturally by Daryl Sharp - Eros, Naturally is a romp with gravitas. It is another “Jungian romance” by the author who created the genre, starting with Chicken Little: The Inside Story (1993) and continuing through over a dozen more tomes. No other writer has so adroitly interwoven Logos and Eros, thinking and feeling. In this new book, Sharp’s approach to psychic well-being, his “Jungian romances,” will interest more people in self-discovery than any of the many academic tomes on the subject. 

The Cat : A Tale of Feminine Redemption by Marie-Louise von Franz - “The Cat” is a Romanian fairy tale about a princess who at the age of seventeen is bewitched—turned into a cat. Von Franz unravels the symbolic threads in this story, from enchantment to beating, the ringing of bells, golden apples, somersaults, witches, etc. Throughout, she explores the great themes of redemption and the union of opposites. Grounded in experience.

The Mother : Archetypal Image in Fairy Tales by Sibylle Birkhauser-Oeri - A practical illustration of how the mother complex functions in the world as well as in the deeper regions of the psyche. The focus here is on positive and negative aspects of the maternal image in well known fairy tales, including Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and Hansel and Gretel.

The Owl was a Bakers Daughter : Obesity, Anorexia Nervosa and the Repressed Feminine by Marion Woodman - Eye-opening insights into the body as mirror of the psyche in eating disorders and weight disturbances. Case studies and practical procedures emphasize the integration of body and soul.

The Pregnant Virgin : A process of Psychological Transformation by Marion Woodman - “The woman who is virgin, one in herself, does what she does not for power or out of the desire to please, but because what she does is true.” Here is writing with a thinking heart, blending art, literature, religion and case material. This book continues Woodman’s pioneering work on the nature of the feminine in both women and men.


The Ravaged Bridegroom : Masculinity in Women by Marion Woodman - Focus on the ways in which a woman may be undermined by a crippling relationship with her inner man. Powerful images from poetry, myth, dreams, analysis and personal experience.

The Sacred Prostitute : Eternal Aspects of the Feminine by Nancy Qualls-Corbett - The disconnection between spirituality and passionate love leaves a broad sense of dissatisfaction and boredom in relationships. The author illustrates how our vitality and capacity for joy depend on restoring the soul of the sacred prostitute to its rightful place in consciousness.

World Weary Woman : Her Wound and Transformation by Cara Barker - A World Weary Woman is one whose characteristic response to stress is to struggle to achieve. However, she feels little joy in the process, suffering a disconnection from her feminine body wisdom and her creativity. Her task is to find a way of living authentically that allows her to express what awakens her heart. The provisional life exhausts her and she knows it. Thus she must detach from who she has been, in order to discover who she is meant to be.


Thursday, October 8, 2015

World Weary Woman : Her Wound and Transformation by Cara Barker



The title of this book immediately grabbed my attention, World Weary Woman, I did indeed feel weary, world weary!  Bone tired from the weight of the world’s demands, the judgements, the constant need for setting goals and achievement, the attending to my wounds, the relentless searching and searching and searching. Was I a world weary woman?

 “Barely breathing. They pause infrequently. Too busy trying hard to never miss a thing, leaving no stone unturned. Hyper vigilant in endless search – searching and searching and searching. When will it stop? All floodlights scanning for their fatal flaw. That one thing … that one perfect answer; that simple explanation which will, at last, redeem … let them rest. Take in, digest that promise of peace that eludes the clutch and grasp. Anything but casual, their quest has been relentless. Looking, ever looking, for the answer. So that then, finally weary of strong-arming themselves against the world, from a pain that comes from too deep and dark a well, they can at last, weary of the battle, sink into those Arms. Rest. Renewal. A place in which to contain what has been neglected for far too long…. They have made it a full-time job… to change, alter, cut away, suck-out, like liposuction, anything which seems imperfect, too human, too ordinary, too plain, too small.”

Barker’s description of World Weary Woman knocked the wind out of me, I felt as if she had gained access to my inner most, private sanctum and was baring my soul to the world. Yes, indeed I am a world weary woman!

Cara Barker spent ten years studying the wounds and journey of World Weary Woman. The book begins with an outline of the World Weary Woman study, and then begins the exploration of Who Is World Weary Woman? This chapter explores the source of the wounding, the strategies developed to cope with loss, the unifying thread in the lives of World Weary Woman, the fear of being unlovable, the fear of failure, the over identification with the masculine action as compensation,  the call to course correct ego one-sidedness and the search for alternative paths.  All of which sounds terribly depressing and gloomy but which somehow I found comforting. Suddenly I was not alone in my wounding or my journey:

“But we are not the first, and we are not alone. As we are reminded through the stories of other people, there are those who have gone before.”

I found myself laughing quietly to myself about my imperfections, free to acknowledge “Yes, I do that” and “Oh, so that’s where that comes from!” I discovered that “In the hole” that “suffering brings, an opening is made, not unlike a well. Such a place within World Weary Woman’s psyche is nothing less than a birthing passage way: through death comes life anew.” And yes indeed, I needed a new source of energy, a new way of doing things, a new lease on life.

The following chapters explore the journey and wounding of World Weary Woman, her struggle, the fall out of harmony with her centre, her soul, the drive to produce, the time frustrations, the secret sense of failure, what hinders finding the treasure, learning to stand up for herself and the importance of having the correct attitude that enables a connection with the Self.

Throughout these chapters, Barker explores the antidote for World Weary Woman:

 “From my first meetings with World Weary Woman, it was clear that she could work. She could analyze, psychologize. But she had not learned how to play… It is in pausing to connect with her own inner wisdom that World Weary Woman learns to create…to cultivate what brings joy, to savour her connection with cosmos. Thus she transforms her suffering through a sacred return to creative living…Little by little, World Weary Woman discovers that living vibrantly is a creative process, an intimate experience whereby she becomes fully known.”

Living vibrantly, joyfully, playfully, creatively, life as an adventure, centered around a core question of “What does creative living require of my today?” This is a philosophy I could embrace.

Shortly after reading this book, I found myself in pottery class, no longer focused on the quality of what I was creating but filled with a new sense of freedom, of play and allowing myself to bring to life that which wanted to be created and suddenly out of the clay a World Weary Woman appeared in my hands. Excitedly I rushed over to show my husband my wonderful creation, my creative genius and proudly beaming over at me he said, “Ah, it’s a hippo.” And we laughed and laughed. This World Weary Woman is learning to play!
This book brought a new level of consciousness into my life and has shown me how “living in my head, leaves the rest of me dead”; it has provided me with a compassionate understanding of my wounds and of my journey; it has brought a new found sense of belonging in the world and of self-acceptance, has opened up the possibility of creating without attachment to the outcome and the greatest gift of all a question that now guides my life: What does creative living require of my today?”

If you are world weary this is the book for you. Till next time, I wish you an adventure in creative living!

Tasha Tollman
Follow this link to purchase the book http://www.innercitybooks.net/book.php?id=96

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Creating a Life: Finding your Individual Path by James Hollis

James Hollis has the extraordinary ability to make the work of Carl Jung meaningfully applicable to our everyday lives and this genius is apparent in Creating a LifeFinding your Individual Path.  The book takes you on a journey into living an examined life, a journey towards consciousness. But Hollis warns this journey will not solve all your problems or heal your pain, it will simply make your life more interesting to you. And who doesn’t want to feel that they are really living; that life is an exciting, meaningful journey as opposed to a boring sequence of mishaps and misadventures?
The book is divided into three parts and has twenty-eight short chapters.
Part one of the book, has six chapters which take you on a journey of self discovery, providing a new frame of reference through which to look at your personal history, understand your life choices, examine your core complexes, uncover  your wounding. The chapters move through the necessity of finding a personal myth, understanding your core complexes, the necessary fictions that make up your life and the problem of spiritual authority. And in each chapter, Hollis gently guides the journey by providing literary examples and insightful, thought provoking questions:
 What is urgent in our lives? What owns us? What do we seek to transcend? What myth are we living? Are we living out our parent’s unlived lives, compensating for their fears? Are we in thrall to the values of the herd, which may offend the soul but keeps one complaint company? What kind of play has our life been, in service too what, or to whom? Do we like what we see, if we look honestly, and whose fault is it then?
By taking your time and savoring what Hollis has to offer, you arrive at the end of the first part of the book with a new consciousness, an awareness of how your wounding is living in the world, a sense of where you are stuck.
Part two of the book is divided into twenty chapters which explore the attitudes and practices necessary for the second half of life. These chapters begin with Jung’s concept of individuation and the necessity of loving one’s fate. The recognition that it is here, in this time, in this place that you are called to live your life, not the life envisioned by your ego or your parents or by societal expectations but your life!
Jung asserted that the greatest burden a child must carry is the unlived lives of their parents and in the following chapter Redeeming Ancestors, Hollis explores four ways in which you can heal the family history that is operating autonomously in you.
Crisis come at critical points in a life and Hollis includes a chapter on crises and their meaning in your life, which inevitably leads to the need for mentors, teachers, gurus and sages who can provide you with all the answers.  But Hollis asserts, nobody can find your path but you, nobody knows more about your history, your struggles, your challenges than you. In this chapter Hollis explores Jung’s concept of the Self, the carrier of your soul and your very own inner guru and it is through connection with the Self that you can find meaning, purpose and a general sense of the rightness of your life. Hollis description of the Self fires the imaginations and creates a longing for this connection.  Unfortunately he does not describe how to form a relationship with the Self and this omission left me feeling frustrated and let down.
The following chapters explore the necessity of accepting your failings and limitations, the necessary mess of things, leaving ambition behind and the necessity of getting over your wounds by attending to your soul.
In the chapter on The Complexity of Relationships, Hollis illustrates how relationships provide mirrors through which you encounter yourself, your patterns. your wounding.  It is through encounters with others that you meet your core perceptions.  Perceptions formed in childhood about how valuable you are, how trustworthy other people are and how the world will meet you. And it is through this meeting with the other, this forced confrontation with yourself, that growth occurs.
Part three of the book is concludes with two chapters, which explore the necessity of feeling grateful for the journey of life and importance of images, of the imagination in creating your life.
For anyone seeking greater consciousness, for anyone wanting to live an examined life, this book provides a rich resource of reflections, a guiding compass with which to navigate the journey of life. Through the many poems and excerpts from the works of many modern writers, including John Fowles, Rilke, D.H. Lawrence, Thoreau, Pascal and Kierkegaard you get a feeling that your journey is undertaken in good company and you are not alone.
Personally, I find myself returning to this book time and time again and with each reading I find myself once again excited, interested in my journey, in the life I am creating. I discover new trails I want to explore.  I discover new ways of getting myself unstuck and moving forward. I find myself creating my life, finding my individual path.
If however, you are looking for a how to manual or a set of guidelines to help you create a life or find your individual path, this book will leave you unfulfilled. It is not a new age cure all. Hollis ask more questions than he answers and the questions he does ask need a lifetime of deep reflection to answer.  And yet, if your journey is to be truly individual, you must find your own path, you must create your own life.
 Till next time, I wish you inspiring reading
This book review is contributed by The Centre for Applied Jungian Studies - http://appliedjung.com/
To purchase this direct from us, please follow this link:  book:http://www.innercitybooks.net/book.php?id=92