Saturday, January 30, 2016

BOOK REVIEW - ANOTHER PIECE OF MY HEART : The Badger Trilogy Book 2



Daryl Sharp, I have just finished your book, ANOTHER PIECE OF MY HEART: The Badger Trilogy, Book 2.  In the busyness of the days, I had to wait for the right time/space to enjoy.  

The back cover describes the work beautifully - it is a delightful page-turner and I was surprised when it ended - sorry not to have another page to turn.  It is also "deceptively" simple!!   It reminds me of those analytic hours where nothing serious seemed to happen but you know something did - you can't quite describe it.  A great part of the psyche was felt and perhaps the big Self got involved too.  

You have taken your reader into the world of a man who now can describe 'what happened' to him after a life-time of relating to Jung, analysis, reflection, containment and the opening of oneself to Eros.  The 'mixed blessings' of the messenger's life coalesce in a delightful see-saw of human experiences from the mundane to the sublime.  And every so often, we feel the see-saw of life suspended momentarily in that weighted perfect balance - the one we always tried for as kids.  And then it's back to the ups and downs of the ride and all the push-ups that entails.  When you touch-down on the lonely, lower realities of the dark nights, the music comes on and you push off the ground again, as does the reader - but still feeling they have touched the ground – that it will happen again and again but the Eros filling the ride imbues the reader with the belief that what goes down must go up again. 

The elements of whimsicality, chance, fate are everywhere present but over time, the puppet comes to realize that he can relate to the puppeteer and help direct his own show.  The puppet becomes more flexible and cooperative (sore feet aside) - after all, he is a puppet (or badger, why not) and nothing else to do but succumb to being one.

And that is Eros – a veritably swing, see-saw, jungle gym in your own turret – a playground for the psyche.

J.P, AC Review of Books, Toronto





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